LEAVE US YOUR MESSAGE
contact us

Hi! Please leave us your message or call us at 01.800.123.456

Thank you! Your submission has been received!

Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form

DATA

An Analysis of 4,100 Cycles of Fertility Treatments

Serena Dovey, Rita M. Sneeringer, Alan S. Penzias

August 8, 2017
Emma Holt

Defining clomiphene citrate & intrauterine insemination 

First things first, the objective of this study is to evaluate the outcomes of patients undergoing fertility treatment with clomiphene citrate (CC) and intrauterine insemination (IUI). According to the study by Serena Dovey, Rita M. Sneeringer, and Alan S. Penzias, CC has been a treatment of choice to help correct ovulatory dysfunction and treat infertility for over 40 years! The reason being is because it’s works by stimulating an increase in the amount of hormones that support the growth and release of a mature egg, inducing ovulation.

‍On the other hand, IUI is defined as a fertility treatment that involves placing sperm inside a woman’s uterus to assist in fertilization. The goal of this treatment is to increase the number of sperm that reaches the fallopian tubes, resulting in pregnancy. It’s important to note moving forward that all patients received oral clomiphene citrate and only patients who completed cycles had intrauterine insemination performed. 

Now you know what clomiphene citrate and intrauterine insemination are and how they will be used in this study, so moving forward you’ll also learn:

  • The dosage of CC treatment and when cycles were cancelled
  • How patients information was stratified 
  • The outcomes of treatment with CC and IUI

Materials & Methods

Organizing the data into categories 

The treatment of CC began at a dose of 50 mg for 5 consecutive days. Many cycles were cancelled when the patient failed to respond to the prescribed dose, ovulated spontaneously before scheduled cycle and when the patient had no movement of sperm detected. Only treatment cycles that were completed moved the patient along to undergo IUI. Boston IVF began using an electronic medical record in September 2002 to record and track cycles. The cycle outcomes were logged as pregnant, not pregnant, cancelled, in progress, blank, or awaiting results. (Note: Researchers defined “pregnant” as patients who had a gestational sac and could be identified in an ultrasound.) Further, data was organized by patient age and the categories included, 35 years and older, 35-37, 38-40, 41-42, and 42 years and younger. The data is additionally stratified by the number of cycles each patient had, ranging from 1-9. 

Results & Conclusion

Who had the highest success rate? 

For women 35 and under, 2,351 cycles were initiated in 983 patients. Among this group of women treated, 24.2% became pregnant. Of the 422 patients in women 35-37, 78 pregnancies were a result with a rate of 18.5%. For women aged 38-40, there were 40 pregnancies in the 264 patients treated and a rate of 15.1%. Only 6 of the 81 patients aged 41-42 became pregnant with a rate of 7.4%. Finally, out of the 55 patients above 42 years, only 1 pregnancy was a result. 

For women 35 and under, 2,351 cycles were initiated in 983 patients. Among this group of women treated, 24.2% became pregnant. Of the 422 patients in women 35-37, 78 pregnancies were a result with a rate of 18.5%. For women aged 38-40, there were 40 pregnancies in the 264 patients treated and a rate of 15.1%. Only 6 of the 81 patients aged 41-42 became pregnant with a rate of 7.4%. Finally, out of the 55 patients above 42 years, only 1 pregnancy was a result.

As expected, the younger woman had a higher cycle than older patients. There is a dramatic drop in success per patient among 41 and 42 year olds, but the low rate above 42 years old suggests that CC and IUI is of no purpose in their treatment overall. This finding is not surprising given the decline in fertility with advancing age that’s been well documented over the years. What’s needed now is a further study of patients aged 41 and older to determine the most effective treatment for those patients.

...

Also worth a read
Case Studies

Evaluating Optimal Treatment for Unexplained Infertility

This research was presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Reproductive Medicine in Washington, D.C.

read more
Pregnancy

Using Assisted Reproduction Technology to Predict Pregnancy Outcomes

H.F. Solomon, R.M. Sneeringer, A.S. Penzias

read more
Female Fertility

Anticipating Risks of Personalized Multiple Births After IVF

Benjamin M. Lannon, M.D., Bokyung Choi, M.S., Michele R. Hacker, S.D., Laura E. Dodge, M.P.H., Beth A. Malizia, M.D., C. Brent Barrett, Ph.D., Wing H. Wong, Ph.D., Mylene W. M. Yao, M.D., Alan S. Penzias, M.D

read more
easy finder